How Families Can Help Children Cope With Fear And Anxiety

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Whether tragic events touch your family personally or are brought into your home via newspapers and television, you can help children cope with the anxiety that violence, death, and disasters can cause.

Whether tragic events touch your family personally or are brought into your home via newspapers and television, you can help children cope with the anxiety that violence, death, and disasters can cause.

Listening and talking to children about their concerns can reassure them that they will be safe. Start by encouraging them to discuss how they have been affected by what is happening around them. Even young children may have specific questions about tragedies. Children react to stress at their own developmental level.

The Caring for Every Child's Mental Health Campaign offers these pointers for parents and other caregivers:

  • Encourage children to ask questions. Listen to what they say. Provide comfort and assurance that address their specific fears. It's okay to admit you can't answer all of their questions.
  • Talk on their level. Communicate with your children in a way they can understand. Don't get too technical or complicated.
  • Find out what frightens them. Encourage your children to talk about fears they may have. They may worry that someone will harm them at school or that someone will try to hurt you.
  • Focus on the positive. Reinforce the fact that most people are kind and caring. Remind your child of the heroic actions taken by ordinary people to help victims of tragedy.
  • Pay attention. Your children's play and drawings may give you a glimpse into their questions or concerns. Ask them to tell you what is going on in the game or the picture. It's an opportunity to clarify any misconceptions, answer questions, and give reassurance.
  • Develop a plan. Establish a family emergency plan for the future, such as a meeting place where everyone should gather if something unexpected happens in your family or neighborhood. It can help you and your children feel safer.

If you are concerned about your child's reaction to stress or trauma, call your physician or a community mental health center.


The Caring for Every Child's Mental Health Campaign Campaign is part of The Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services Program for Children and Their Families of the Federal Center for Mental Health Services.

Parents and caregivers who wish to learn more about mental well-being in children should call 1-800-789-2647 (toll-free) or visit mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/child/ to download a free publications catalog (Order No. CA-0000).

The Federal Center for Mental Health Services is an agency of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Article by SAMHSA. This article was reprinted with permission from and credit given to the United States Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Mental Health Information Center.

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